Why Are Donald Trump's Accusers Only Coming Forward Now?

Why Are Donald Trump's Accusers Only Coming Forward Now?

“There’s still this misconception that there’s something to be gained by being a victim of sexual assault. … Rehashing a painful moment publicly is not fun, especially when you know that so many people who hear that story are cultured to question you.”

—Kamilah Willingham

Inspired by Bill Cosby, California Drops Statute of Limitations on Rape Cases

Inspired by Bill Cosby, California Drops Statute of Limitations on Rape Cases

Willingham worked at the California Women's Law Center when the first draft of SB 813 was submitted to legislators. "It was pretty exciting to be a part of this process," she says, "especially because it was something that so many people thought would never happen."

"I think we're in a moment where the world is finally valuing and paying attention to the voices and experiences of survivors of sexual assault."

Nate Parker Brings a Cloud of Controversy to Toronto Film Festival

Nate Parker Brings a Cloud of Controversy to Toronto Film Festival

“I think it’s a terrible idea for him to go on campus educating about rape and rape culture,” said Kamilah Willingham, an activist who appeared in “The Hunting Ground,” the campus rape documentary. “He still doesn’t get it. He’s trying to have it both ways.”

Protest Held at Jail after Release of Stanford Rapist Brock Turner

Protest Held at Jail after Release of Stanford Rapist Brock Turner

Harvard Law School student and sexual assault survivor Kamilah Willingham said that like Turner’s victim, she was raped while unconscious. Unlike Turner’s victim, who remained incapacitated until the next morning, she woke up in the middle of her assault.

“I reported it even though I know how low conviction and prosecution rates are,” she said. “I knew that in order to have a shot at justice, you have to prove not only what happened to you but that you weren’t asking for it. … I thought that my assailant would be held accountable. I was wrong.”

As Brock Turner is released, politicians demand ouster of judge in Stanford rape case

As Brock Turner is released, politicians demand ouster of judge in Stanford rape case

Kamilah Willingham, who reported that she was sexually assaulted while a student at Harvard Law School, called Persky part of the problem. “Because even if the police believe you, even if the prosecutors believe you, even if against all odds the jurors believe you, at the end of the day, that can all be undermined,” she said...

After Brock Turner: did the Stanford sexual assault case change anything?

After Brock Turner: did the Stanford sexual assault case change anything?

Some nights, Kamilah Willingham would lie awake, unable to fall asleep until the sun came up and she felt safe again. The 30-year-old Los Angeles activist says the trauma of surviving sexual assault affected her physical and mental wellbeing, and although it’s been five years, there are still days when she struggles to get out of bed.

In recent months, however, she has made a concerted effort to be more open about her emotional scars, in large part because she was so moved by the viral impact statement of the sexual assault victim at Stanford University.

The Nate Parker Interview: What’s Next for ‘The Birth of a Nation’

The Nate Parker Interview: What’s Next for ‘The Birth of a Nation’

Now, some potential ticket buyers have already sworn off his movie months before its October debut in theaters. “You collaborated on a rape 17 years ago, and now you pull him in to make this film together,” says Kamilah Willingham, 30, one of the campus-assault survivors featured in the documentary “The Hunting Ground.” “I’m trying to picture a way this could turn out in which the film can still be celebrated. I can’t.”

What you should know about reporting sexual assault on your college campus and your Title IX rights

What you should know about reporting sexual assault on your college campus and your Title IX rights

“Some want to see their rapist rot in prison and have to register as a sex offender. And some people aren’t even ready to talk about it or confront what happened to them until it’s too late to report, or ever,” Willingham said.

“I want survivors to know that that’s okay, too. There is no ‘right’ way to survive sexual assault; there’s no duty to do anything but survive as best you can,” Willingham said.

Asking for an Apology

Asking for an Apology

“I didn’t really expect my school to apologize then, but I also didn’t expect my school to remain silent while 19 of the professors who presumably helped overturn my assailant’s sanction very publicly doubled down on his side, extending my rape trial into the court of public opinion and joining my assailant’s efforts to brand me as a vindictive, slutty liar,” Willingham wrote in an essay this week...

Survivor-Activists Ask Colleges to #JustSaySorry

Survivor-Activists Ask Colleges to #JustSaySorry

“Maybe there simply hasn’t been enough incentive for them to apologize,” Willingham said. “They don’t apologize for or acknowledge past failures, but we’re supposed to trust that they’re devoted to changing the administrative culture that has failed and hurt students survivors for so long? Nah. Sounds like institutional gaslighting to me. And gaslighting is an effective way to maintain control over the status quo in unbalanced relationships—which makes me think that schools won’t apologize as long as they think they can get away with it.